Resources

17 Results (showing 1 - 10)
Toolkit to help tribal justice system practitioners create or enhance reentry programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives returning from jail or prison. Offers guidance for practitioners from formation of a planning team through all key steps of developing a reentry program, including developing partnerships, refining the reentry program, measuring program impact, and planning for sustainability.
Article outlining the ACES Aware Initiative and the strengths and barriers for use with Tribal, Urban Indian, and rural stakeholders in California.
The final webinar presented by Generations United in partnership with the Office for Victims of Crime and the JBS International Training and Technical Assistance Team, entitled, American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Grandfamilies: Helping Children Thrive Through Connection to Family and Cultural Identity was delivered on July 7th, 2021.
This report not only discusses the impact of ACEs on tribal communities but provides strategies to reduce ACEs and the resulting long-term impacts of ACEs and the interplay between ACEs and substance use.
"The Presidential Task Force Report on Protecting Native American Children in the Indian Health Service System identifying strategies and means to better protect Native American children and improve IHS’s ability to provide quality healthcare to over 2.6 million Native Americans. "
WeRNative, a Native youth outreach platform, partnered together with Northwest Native American Center of Excellence at OHSU, We R Native, We Are Healers, and the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board in the campaign to "Brothers".
WeRNative, a Native youth outreach platform, partnered together with Northwest Native American Center of Excellence at OHSU, We R Native, We Are Healers, and the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board in the campaign to "Exercise Safe Sweats".
A story for Indigenous youth designed to explain through cultural understandings COVID 19 and its impact on Indigenous communities. Publication of this book is supported through a collaboration with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Reference Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
The Indian Country Child Trauma Center (ICCTC) was established to develop trauma-related treatment protocols, outreach materials, and service delivery guidelines specifically designed for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and their families. It is housed at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. The ICCTC has been awarded the Project Making Medicine grant from the Children's Bureau to provide training to clinicians in Indian Country in the Honoring Children, Mending the Circle curriculum, which is the cultural enhancement of Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. ICCTC is also the grantee for the OJJDP Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance program.