Resources

8 Results (showing 1 - 8)
The opioid epidemic continues to have devastating con­sequences for children and families across the country, with growing social and financial implications for states. This report highlights effective strategies by Kentucky, New Hampshire, and Virginia to support families impacted by opioid use disorder (OUD). It includes strategies, ideas for maximizing resources and opportunities to support children and families impacted by OUD.
This resource is a short report from the Children's Bureau and The Administration for Children, and Familiies that describes estimated data from Fiscal year 2016. The Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System data describes various subsets regarding children in foster care.
This resource from the Administration for Children and Families and the Children's Bureau describes the trends in foster care and adoption from fiscal years 2008-2017. The data is based upon the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System.
This report produced by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration includes data regarding the number of children living with a parent who has a substance abuse disorder. Data includes children living with parents who have an alcohol abuse use disorder or illicit drug use disorder and a brief discussion of the data.
This research brief from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluations contains findings regarding the opioid epidemic and the child welfare system. The brief addresses the results of a mixed methods study that examined caseloads, availability and use of substance treatment and the child welfare system response to the epidemic.
To provide a broad view of the widespread and costly impact of the opioid epidemic, United Hospital Fund (UHF) convened a meeting on October 3-4, 2018, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, with the collaboration of the Milbank Memorial Fund. The title of the meeting, “The Ripple Effect: Children and Kinship Caregivers Affected by the Opioid Epidemic,” was intended to convey the far-reaching scope of the problem. The goal of the meeting was to produce a high-level policy and programmatic agenda to address the effect of the opioid crisis on women, children, and families. This paper lays out that agenda.
This policy brief offers recommendations for clinical interventions and training, as well as prevention efforts.
This bulletin discusses the second National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV II), which was conducted in 2011 as a followup to the original NatSCEV I survey.