Resources

38 Results (showing 1 - 10)
The National Survey of Children’s Health(NSCH), funded and directed by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), provides information on the health and well-being of children ages 0-17 years in the United States. The NSCH is the largest national and state-level survey on the health and health care needs of children, their families, and their communities.
The Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health (DRC), a project of the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI), under a cooperative agreement with the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), announced the release of the combined 2018-2019 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) Child and Family Health Measures.
Head Start launched 34 American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) Head Start programs in 1965. There are, now, approximately 44,000 children of AI/AN heritage served, both in AI/AN and non-tribal programs. The Office of The Head Start Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center - American Indian and Alaska Native Programs honors the rich cultural heritage of AI/AN children, families, and communities. Based on the needs of local communities, Head Start programs offer traditional language and cultural practices to provide high-quality services to young children and their families. Targeted tools and resources, including Tribal Consultations, Tribal Language and Culture Materials, AI/AN - Specific School Readiness Materials, Tribal Home Visiting, and Tribal Child Care and Development Fund and AI/AN Head Start Comparison are available to assist in the planning, development, and organization of AI/AN and other programs serving AI/AN communities.
National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA), a private, non-profit membership organization (Native and non-Native individuals, groups and organizations) based in Portland, Oregon working to support the safety, health, and spiritual strength of American Indian and Alaska Native children along the continuum of their lives. NICW support tribes in building the capacity to prevent child abuse and neglect through positive systems change at the state, federal, and tribal levels.
The Texas Network of Youth Services (TNOYS) mission is to strengthen services and support for Texas youth and families to help them overcome challenges and achieve healthy development. TNOYS uses a unique comprehensive systems change approach to focus in on key value areas that research indicates are key to achieving the vision for a healthy future for Texas. Key value areas include Equity and Inclusion, Youth Voice and Youth/Adult Partnership, Research and performance-Driven Policy and Practice, Cross-Systems Collaboration. Many of TNOYS Youth Engagement tools can be accessed for free. Tools include templates to engage in advocacy locally and state-wide, training tools for workforce, webinars and TA to support youth engagement and adult partnership, a publication library, an Emergency Response Resource Center, Youth Homelessness Resource Tools and 2020 Census resources. A membership to support more advanced training can be accessed through an individual or organizational membership. Individual membership fee is $50 year. The Organizational Membership cost is based on the organization's annual budget. Organizational member benefits include Advocacy and Mobilization, Programs and Services, Discounts, and Connections.
The Capacity Building Center for Tribes works to design and deliver tools and resources for tribal child welfare professionals. These tools and resources, as well as other programs developed by tribes for tribes are available on the Capacity Building Center for Tribes Tribal Information Exchange. Child welfare practice areas of support include Strengthening Families, Partnerships, Indian Child Welfare Act, Sex Trafficking Prevention, Data, Healing and Wellness, and Title IV-B and Title IV- E. Other resources available on the Tribal Information Exchange support Professional Development, Systems and Organizations and connection with peers in child welfare in Indian Country. The Tribal Information Exchange site also includes featured resources for tribes including emergency preparedness and a robust library exchange.
Keep Connected is a website that offers families and organizations that support families help to build stronger relationships. Its goal is to strengthen family relationships to help children become their best selves. The site provides helpful information and resources.
This 2018 webinar from the National Conference of State Legislators presents information on opiiods and early adversity and discusses childhood trauma and addiction. It also presents examples of successes in Tennesee and Vermont.
In response to the Administration’s 2010 National Drug Control Strategy, the U.S. Department of Justice established the Federal Interagency Task Force on Drug Endangered Children (DEC).The DEC Task Force Federal Partnerships Subcommittee conducted an assessment of promising practices in the field and of training modules provided by federal, state, local, tribal, and community-based providers across the country. This toolkit is a compilation of many of those practices for your use, separated into three categories: (1) increasing DEC awareness, (2) fostering community collaboration and (3) creating a more effective response.
This document developed by SAMHSA provides brief summaries of substance abuse prevention strategies and associated programs that have been evaluated to determine their effects on the nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD.) It should be considered a resource for state and community prevention practitioners seeking information on interventions to reduce NMUPD