Resources

17 Results (showing 1 - 10)
CDC Veto Violence: We All Have a Role in Preventing ACEs is a set of training modules designed for selected professionals. Continuing education credits are available.
This report provides a snapshot of CDC's work in Indian Country, with tribal nations, tribal organizations, and American Indians and Alaska Natives across the United States. The CDC's Tribal Advisory Committee (TAC) asked CDC to prepare a booklet highlighting the work being done in Indian Country as part of a broader portfolio to improve health and protect against health threats. American Indians and Alaska Natives have higher rates of disease, injury, and premature death than other racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Many Native populations also have higher rates of poverty, unemployment, poor housing, and low education, among other adversities. These afflictions result from historical insults and injustices, perpetrated over many generations. CDC works with and supports American Indian tribes, Alaska Native villages, tribal organizations, and Tribal Epidemiology Centers to promote health, prevent disease, reduce health disparities, and strengthen connections to culture and lifeways that improve health and wellness that have been threatened over generations. CDC’s work with and support of Indian Country to improve the lives of Native peoples is reflected in this report.
The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors health behaviors, conditions, and experiences among high school students throughout the United States. The system includes a national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), conducted by CDC, and separate state, local school district, territorial, and tribal school–based YRBSs, referred to as site-level surveys. YRBSS monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of mortality, morbidity, and social problems among youths and adults. This resource includes data collected in 2019.
In response to the Administration’s 2010 National Drug Control Strategy, the U.S. Department of Justice established the Federal Interagency Task Force on Drug Endangered Children (DEC).The DEC Task Force Federal Partnerships Subcommittee conducted an assessment of promising practices in the field and of training modules provided by federal, state, local, tribal, and community-based providers across the country. This toolkit is a compilation of many of those practices for your use, separated into three categories: (1) increasing DEC awareness, (2) fostering community collaboration and (3) creating a more effective response.
Using the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool to Assess and Plan for sustainability.
This chart outlines elements of the Victims of Crime Act. The Crime Victims Fund (the Fund) was established by the Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) of 1984. The Fund is financed by fines and penalties paid by convicted federal offenders, not from tax dollars.
As part of developing model standards, the Office for Victims of Crime has developed a list of glossary terms for information about specific standards applicable to those terms.
The goal of the Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative, supported by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, is to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. Beginning in 2010, and continuing over 18 months, Vision 21 projects examined the current framework of the victim assistance field in the United States and explored new and existing challenges facing the field.
A listing from the Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance of the 2018 grantees who were awarded funds by the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act. States and programs awarded the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program grants are listed along with amounts awarded.
This resource describes the 1998 Adverse Childhood Experiences study. It discusses that science of the study, prevelance and impact of adverse childhood experiences. It also decribes the neurobiology of trauma and stress.