Resources

20 Results (showing 1 - 10)
The National Child Traumatic Stress Network - The Power of Parenting: How to Help Your Child After the Death of a Sibling from Substance Use or Overdose provides information for all caregivers who are parenting children after the death of a sibling from substance use or overdose. Drawing from the wisdom of parents and children who have been through this experience this tip sheet provides information on how to facilitate grieving. This fact sheet is intended to support parents of children ages 7 and older.
This toolkit was developed by the Adolescent Trauma and Substance Abuse Committee of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network to raise awareness about the needs of youth with traumatic stress and substance abuse problems and to promote evidence-based practices in clinical settings. It is meant to serve as a training guide for providers working with this population. The project was funded by SAMHSA.
This is a book designed to be used in therapy for young children and functions as an excellent resource for those who have experienced physical or sexual abuse, or other trauma. Readers will follow four children as they learn ways to cope with their own trauma.
Parents, educators, therapists, and social workers alike have declared The Invisible String an important tool for coping with all kinds of separation anxiety, loss, and grief.
This 2018 webinar from the National Conference of State Legislators presents information on opiiods and early adversity and discusses childhood trauma and addiction. It also presents examples of successes in Tennesee and Vermont.
Research has demon¬strated a strong relationship between childhood exposure to traumatic events and a variety of substance use-related behaviors. Throughout a person’s lifetime, childhood trauma exposure can be a significant factor in addiction and mental health problems, and approaches to prevention, intervention, and recovery efforts. This resource outlines the consequences of opioid misuse related to trauma and includes policy implications and recommendations as well as additional resources.
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the Lifelong Consequences of Trauma is an article from the American Academy of Pediatrics that defines ACEs, talks about the role of stress, the biology of trauma, the effect of trauma on a parent's ability and what lies ahead including several evidence-based, effective clinical treatments to call on in intervening with children who have experienced trauma and adversity, including Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy18 and Parent-Child Interactive Therapy.
At least one trauma is reported by two-thirds of American children and adolescents (hereafter referred to as “children”); 33% of children experience multiple traumas before reaching adulthood. Although most children are resilient, trauma exposure is associated with increased risk for medical and mental health problems including Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and attempted and completed suicide. Core TF-CBT principles are 1) phase- and components-based treatment; 2) component order and proportionality of phases; 3) the use of gradual exposure in TF-CBT and 4) the importance of integrally including parents or other primary caregivers into TF-CBT treatment.
The opioid epidemic continues to have devastating con­sequences for children and families across the country, with growing social and financial implications for states. This report highlights effective strategies by Kentucky, New Hampshire, and Virginia to support families impacted by opioid use disorder (OUD). It includes strategies, ideas for maximizing resources and opportunities to support children and families impacted by OUD.
This is a screening tool to determine the number of adverse childhood experiences in a person's life. The tool is based upon the 1998 research study that identified ACES or adverse childhood experiences.