Resources

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This video, "Recovering from Opioid Addiction is Possible", is produced by the the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board and is part of a series that was created for tribal community members to learn more about preventing, treating, and recovering from opioid use disorder. For more information visit: npaihb.org/opioid.
This video, "Healing Ourselves and Our Communities" is produced by the Northwest Portland Area Indian Healh Board and is part of a series that was created for tribal community members to learn more about preventing, treating, and recovering from opioid use disorder.
This Naloxone Saves infographic can be used for training for recognizing an opioid overdose and adminstering naloxone.
"Stigma & Empathy: Exploring Our Response to Substance Use Disorder" training video for professionals and laypersons demonstrates how stigma affects people with substance use disorders. This engaging and well-illustrated 14:19 minute YouTube video also highlights how stigma affects children and families of those with SUD. Ways to replace stigma with empathy are shared as a way to help people access resources to heal and achieve wellness. The video and companion guide explain the serious consequences of stigma on communities.
CMS has developed this toolkit to help community partners stay informed on CMS and HHS materials available on the COVID-19. Many partners are highlighted for their community care linkages, including faith-based partners, youth partners, LGBT partners, caregiver partners, African American partners, Asian American and Pacific Islander partners, Latino partners, and many other partners in the continuum of care during the COVID-19 pandemic.
This report provides a snapshot of CDC's work in Indian Country, with tribal nations, tribal organizations, and American Indians and Alaska Natives across the United States. The CDC's Tribal Advisory Committee (TAC) asked CDC to prepare a booklet highlighting the work being done in Indian Country as part of a broader portfolio to improve health and protect against health threats. American Indians and Alaska Natives have higher rates of disease, injury, and premature death than other racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Many Native populations also have higher rates of poverty, unemployment, poor housing, and low education, among other adversities. These afflictions result from historical insults and injustices, perpetrated over many generations. CDC works with and supports American Indian tribes, Alaska Native villages, tribal organizations, and Tribal Epidemiology Centers to promote health, prevent disease, reduce health disparities, and strengthen connections to culture and lifeways that improve health and wellness that have been threatened over generations. CDC’s work with and support of Indian Country to improve the lives of Native peoples is reflected in this report.
The Center for Native American Youth is a national advocacy organization working to improve the health, safety, and overall well-being of Native American youth ages 24 and under. The Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) strives to bring greater national attention to the issues facing Native American youth while fostering community-driven solutions, with special emphasis on youth suicide prevention.
Sullivan’s story is a resource for families broken apart by mental health issues, incarceration, and the addiction epidemic. It is a tool for teachers, counselors, CASA volunteers, psychotherapists, social workers, and the caregivers of children in kinship care
This 2-page fact sheet defines trauma families go through and list some examples. It describes ways to address trauma and coping skills.
This is a book designed to be used in therapy for young children and functions as an excellent resource for those who have experienced physical or sexual abuse, or other trauma. Readers will follow four children as they learn ways to cope with their own trauma.